Giving Back

Where I give back

The Tashinga Initiative in Zimbabwe  protects at-risk black rhino, elephant and other species in their natural habitats. I created two original works for the sole purpose of raising awareness and giving back to the wildlife that they were inspired by. Learn more...

Protecting black rhinos

“When All Else Fails, Fight Back!” 

The sculpture was inspired by the heroic struggle of this threatened species to defend itself and is only available as a gift for a donation to The Tashinga Trust of $5,000.* Learn more...

Protecting elephants

“Every Thirteen Minutes” 

The sculpture underscores the urgency of action required to protect this species from poaching and is only available as a gift for a donation to The Tashinga Trust of $10,000.* Learn more...

Making the Difference

THE TASHINGA INITIATIVE: Field camp in the Zambezi River Valley, Zimbabwe

I visited The Tashinga Trust in 2014 to witness firsthand the work they are doing to support the protection of Zimbabwe’s wildlife. Inadequate budgets for conservation effort puts prize wildlife species, such as rhino and elephant at extremely high risk from poachers, and this risk currently is escalating. The Trust addresses the lack of operational capacity, illegal activity, unsustainable resource use and the needs of ranger communities who are key to protecting each National Park and Safari Area.

Lynne Taylor, Founder & Executive Director

“As I sleep intermittently at night in my tent, because of the close presence of lions, elephant, owls, and hyaenas, I think of the work that is accomplished only because there are people like you in the big wide world, recognising and supporting us guys here to get the job done.” 

The Sculpture: When All Else Fails Fight Back!

Lynne was given a special bronze sculpture of a black rhino: "The clay began taking shape out of a raw place in my heart. Rhinos always seemed to be as solid and permanent as the granite boulders of a lowveld koppie; now they are being poached in the parks created to protect them.

The Tashinga Initiative Challenge

The Tashinga Initiative provides support to the protection of Zimbabwe’s wildlife in the Zambezi River Valley’s Protected Areas under the jurisdiction of Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority. These collectively include UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, Biosphere Reserves and two Trans Frontier Conservation Areas.

Please visit: www.tashinga.org

Your Donation

How it works

Your donation is made directly to TASHINGA INITIATIVE TRUST through the GLOBAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION (501c(3)) to protect at-risk black rhino, elephant and other species in their natural habitats - 25% of the amount will be allocated to foundry costs for the bronze casting; the balance as a net donation is tax deductible. These limited edition sculptures are available only through a donation in support of the Trust. I created these original works for the sole purpose of raising awareness and giving back to the wildlife that they were inspired by. Please contact me before making your donation.


Please specify that this donation is for TASHINGA INITIATIVE TRUST. This can be done during the donation process, where you can select which recipient organization the donation is for, or by adding a comment with your donation.

“When All Else Fails Fight Back!” by Hermann Brandt

When All Else Fails, Fight Back!

The Story of Black Rhinos

Unable to wait for international pressure, negotiations or education and a change of policies to take effect, a black rhino explodes into a poacher’s camp. 


The tables are suddenly turned. 


In the snorting chaos of dust and breaking branches, poachers scramble to avoid the lethal flailing of the very horn they have come to harvest. 


The terror and desperation of this moment affords us a glimpse into life as a threatened species. 


The clay began taking shape out of a raw place in my heart. Rhinos always seemed to be as solid and permanent as the granite boulders of a lowvelt koppie; now they are being poached in the parks created to protect them. 


Previous guerilla-war tactics have recently found a new battleground. In a bloody war for horn and ivory, a fight rages in hidden places all over the African continent on a daily basis. 


Deep-seated corruption and greed within governments has created an environment conducive to the illegal trade of animal products. Unscrupulous dealers take advantage of the desperate poverty of those marginalized by the leaders they voted into positions of authority effectively turning ordinary citizens into poachers.


Diplomacy, tolerance and negotiation are the tools used by developed nations to overcome problems and differences. But massive disparities in culture, worldview and socio-economic realities seem to render such tactics ineffective in the developing world. Maybe the story behind this small bronze will reinforce the urgency of the situation and inspire us to be more directly involved. 


The freeze-frame climax of the bronze shows the rhino grinding an AK 47 into the ground, triumphant – if only for this moment – in the battle for its own survival.


The message should be clear to us all: WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS, FIGHT BACK!

The Bottom Line

At the current rate of slaughter, rhino killings will exceed births within two to four years. The last of these animals will then be picked off one by one until the species is gone forever. 

“Every Thirteen Minutes” by Hermann Brandt

Every Thirteen Minutes

The Story of Elephants

 A small family of elephants feeds through the African bush on their way to the river. You won’t hear an elephant walking, but they are not quiet animals. Herds communicate with one another over huge distances rumbling and trumpeting as they go.  


They come into a clearing and stop dead. Startled by the remains of an elephant, the family is immediately silent. Their movements slow, and their body language changes. 


Elephants are intelligent animals that experience many of the same emotions humans do. It is well documented that whenever a herd comes across the carcass or the bones of an elephant the whole herd will fall silent and come, one by one and tentatively, maybe nervously but certainly respectfully pick up the bones with their sensitive trunks. They will taste them, touch them to their bodies and lay them down again as if to pay tribute and acknowledging their life and then move on quietly. 


But this time something is different. 


The tension is tangible. They listen. The subadult moves forward hesitantly. She’s not sure what she’s seeing. Her trunk stretches out to feel, to smell, to understand. She’s young, but her instinct tells her that this is not the scene of a natural death. 


Her mother senses something. She sniffs the air, trunk curved above her head, and suddenly, she knows. She feels the violence still hanging from the broken branches and mixed in with the churned up dirt. The machete marks clearly visible on the skull – POACHERS! She pulls back and trumpets loudly, panicking the small family. The big bull immediately enraged, wheels around to confront the danger and nearly tramples the tiny, bewildered calf in the chaos. 

The Bottom Line

Every thirteen minutes an elephant is slaughtered for its ivory in Africa. Out of a population of ten million in the early 1800s, as of The Great Elephant Census of 2017, only 260,000 remain. Extinction is forever. 

Start Your Ripple Effect

I want to make the difference by making a donation to The Tashinga Initiative and receiving a gift of a bronze sculpture by Hermann Brandt:

Hermann Brandt Fine Art

151 Heritage Drive, Cochrane, Alberta, Canada

403-604-2394

Ripple Effect - The Show

Sept 29

Ripple Effect Public Reception

2 PM - 4 PM

Leighton Art Centre

+ Event Details

Sept 29

Ripple Effect Public Reception

Featuring paintings, sculpture, and photography by three local artists, Ripple Effect honours endangered, threatened and at-risk species from across North America and Africa. Artists Hermann Brandt, Debra Garside, and Donna Wilson present a body of work that provides us the opportunity to reconnect to the animals with whom we share less and less of our world. Proceeds from the sale of two Bronzes by artist Hermann Brandt will go directly towards supporting at-risk species at the Tashinga Initiative, a Wildlife Protection Trust located in Zimbabwe Africa.


Please join us on Saturday September 29, 2018 and we host a public Opening Reception for Ripple Effect. Meet the artists and enjoy some light refreshments as you take in this very special exhibition. This a public event - bring your family & friends. Admission to Leighton Art Centre is always Pay-What-You-Can.

2 PM - 4 PM

Leighton Art Centre